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Poker Games

There are many variations of the poker game but when it comes down to it the rules are pretty much the same.

Below we have a list of the poker games you will find in our recommended poker rooms.

Texas Hold 'em

Or just Hold 'em, as most players know it - is probably the best known and most popular form of poker today. The game is commonly played at a six or nine handed table, but tables can have fewer seats.

Texas Hold 'em is probably the best known and most popular form of poker today.

Each player starts with two hole cards. There are three rounds of community cards. These are dealt face up, for every player to use, with betting after each round.

The best 5-card hand using any combination of the five community cards and two hole cards wins.

Omaha Hi

Omaha Hi is a form of hold 'em. The game is commonly played at a six or nine handed table. The betting and blinds are exactly the same as hold 'em.

Omaha Poker, or Omaha Hi, is a variation of Hold 'em played with four hole cards instead of two. At showdown, the best five-card hand using exactly two of your hole cards and three cards from the board wins. Unlike Hold 'em, you may not use more than three cards from the board. The betting and blinds are exactly the same as in Hold 'em

Omaha Hi/Lo

Omaha Hi/Lo is a variant of Omaha Hi. The game is also often called Omaha 8, and is commonly played at a six or nine handed table. The betting and blinds are exactly the same as in Omaha.

The betting, blinds, and postings are exactly the same as in Omaha. At the showdown, the pot is split between the holder of the highest hand, and the holder of the lowest hand, if the low hand qualifies.

To qualify for a low hand, you must have five distinct cards (no pairs), with no card higher than an 8. Remember, since you have to play two cards in your hand, the two cards in your hand and three on the board all need to be 8 or lower. Straights and flushes do not count against you. The best 5-card low hand is A-2-3-4-5 of any suit. The hand is "ranked" by starting with the highest low card. 7-4-3-2-1 would be considered a 7-low, and would lose to 6-4-3-2-1, a 6-low. If two players each have low hands with the same highest card, the next highest card determines the winner. 7-5-4-3-2 loses to 7-4-3-2-1. If there is no qualifying low hand, the high hand wins the entire pot.

Just as in the high version of Omaha, each player starts with four hole cards, and then the dealer places five cards face-up in the center of the table. These community cards are part of each player's hand, so each player has access to seven cards. The difference between Omaha high and Omaha Hi/Lo, is that in Omaha Hi/Lo each player can potentially have two different hands: a high hand and a low hand.

Razz

If you wish you could cash in on your "bad" hands, Razz may be the game for you. Part lowball, part Stud Hi, the goal is to make the best five-card low hand from the seven cards you are dealt. It is played with anywhere from 2 to 8 players.

Did you ever wish your "bad" hands could make you money? Then Razz could be the game for you. Part lowball, part 7-card stud, the goal is to make the best five-card low hand from seven cards.

Each player starts with two hole cards and one upcard; there are then three more rounds of upcards, with betting after each card, and a final downcard, just as in stud. Each player ends up with seven cards: four face up and three face down.

The player holding the best low hand using any five of their cards wins the pot. Aces are always low, and flushes and straights have no effect on the value of a hand. Also, it's good to remember that drawing a pair will not hurt your hand. The best possible hand is A-2-3-4-5.

Stud Hi

Stud Hi is a game that most home game players know. The game is played at an eight-handed table and involves five rounds of betting.

Long before Hold 'em became "the game", Stud Hi (also called Seven-Card stud), was what you played when poker night came around. One part skill, one part memory, one part strategy, no parts boring.

Each player starts with two hole cards and one upcard; there are then three more rounds of upcards, with betting after each card, and a final downcard, followed by a final betting round. Each player ends up with seven cards: four face up and three face down. The player holding the best hand using any five of their cards wins the pot. As in Hold 'em, aces play both high and low.

Stud Hi/Lo

Stud Hi/Lo is a variant of Stud Hi. The betting, ante, and bring-in are exactly the same as in Stud Hi

Seven-card Stud Hi/Lo is a variant of Seven-card Stud. The betting, ante, and bring-in are exactly the same as in Seven-card stud. At the showdown, the pot is split between the holder of the highest hand and the holder of the lowest hand, if the low hand qualifies.

To qualify for a low hand, you must have five distinct cards (no pairs), with no card higher than an 8. Straights and flushes do not count against you. The best 5 card low hand is A-2-3-4-5 of any suit. The hand is "ranked" by starting with the highest low card. 7-4-3-2-1 would be considered a 7-low, and would lose to 6-4-3-2-1, a 6-low. If two players each have low hands with the same highest card, the next highest card determines the winner. 7-5-4-3-2 loses to 7-4-3-2-1. If there is no qualifying low hand, the high hand wins the entire pot.

The only betting difference is that fourth street does not offer an optional increase in the betting limit, regardless of any pairs on the board. In Seven-card stud Hi/Lo, the first two betting rounds are always at the lower limit, and the last three always at the higher limit.

Just as in the high version of Seven-card stud, each player starts with two hole cards and one upcard; there are then three more rounds of upcards, with betting after each card, and a final downcard, followed by a final betting round. Each player ends up with seven cards: four face up and three face down.

In Seven-card Stud Hi/Lo, each player forms a high hand and, if possible, a qualifying low hand, using any five of his seven cards. Both the high hand combination and the low hand combination can use the same set of cards, but they don't have to. As in Seven-card Stud, aces play both high and low. You may use an ace as a high card for one hand, and as a low card for another.

Poker Hands

Whichever poker game you are playing, the rankings of the various hands never change. The hands are, in decending order:

Royal Flush:

Ace, King, Queen, Jack & 10 of the same suit.

Straight Flush:

Five cards of the same suit in numerical order.

4 of a Kind:

Four cards of the same numerical value, the highest being 4 Aces.

Full House:

Two of one numerical value and three of another, determined by the value of the trio.

Flush:

Five of the same suit but not numerical order, determined by the highest card or, in the event of a tie, the second highest.

Straight:

Five cards of numerical sequence but not of the same suit, determined by the highest card.

3 of a Kind:

Three of the same value, determined by which is numerically higher.

2 Pairs:

Two different pairs, determined by the highest pair in each hand or, in event of a tie, the second pair.

1 Pair:

Determined by which is higher or, in event of a tie, by the highest card in the hand outside the pair.

High Card:

If none of the above is held, the winner is determined by whoever holds the highest card, or, in the event of a tie, the second highest card.

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